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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 5, 2013 7:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: The Doors (non-Dead)

I was over at LIA's very cool www.deadsources.blogspot.com and came across some comments by Robbie Kreiger in an article and it put me in mind of my utter disdain for anything involving the Doors.I was wondering where folks of the forum fall on the Doors.A sample lyric from Roadhouse Blues by the "American Poet".

You gotta roll,roll,roll
you gotta thrill my soul,all right
Roll,roll,roll,roll
Thrill my soul
You got a beep a gunk a chucha
Honk konk konk
You gotta each you puna
Each ya bop a luba
Each yall bump a kechonk
Ease sum konk
Ya,ride

It's as if Samy Davis Jr. did some acid and lost his mind in Vegas one night.

He follows that after the next verse with,"I woke up this morning,I got myself a beer" which is so profound he repeats it and follows it with "the future is uncertain and the end is always near",something that needs to be said if you have no grasp of the obvious and wake up to a beer.To call him the "American Poet" is insulting to almost every American poet.

Here is some poetry in song form given to us by a brilliant poet,Patti Smith.It is perfect blend of thought provoking poetry in a beautiful bed of music sung with great emotion and impact.The lyrics/poetry is included.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhDJZm_HyXY

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Poster: McKush Date: Apr 6, 2013 1:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

thankfully most of the bands from the 60's scene didnt make it and the ones that were more than something to have in front of you while on loads of drugs or sober are the ones that did make it. the doors were a mystical band and honestly i think that if they were formed at any other time in any other place they would have not been such a phenom. but good is good and when music moves you as we all know, it is something unique. there is a reason john densmore doesnt play with the doors anymore and really wants nothing to do with the band. the doors were a huge part in the times and that i often forgotten. the lyrics you chose surely arent poetic but like some of the other replies pretty much every band has some lame ass lyrics at some point.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 2:01pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Folks seem to making a case for the fact that a lot of people write bad lyrics and I certainly agree with that and I am pointing out some of the bad lyrics Jim Morrison wrote,I don't have the inclination to go digging through their catalog to cherry pick more drivel and hippie horse shit,but it seems more plentiful than it should for a well respected lyricist.If Jim Morrison looked like Pigpen I wonder how popular he would have been,if he came along in the 70's he probably would have been a bad singer songwriter,disco artist or real tortured punk poser.By all accounts he seemed to be an insufferable asshole so I chose to write him off like that.I find their music neither good nor forgotten,but overrated and no more important than a ton of other 60's music that is beloved for it's nostalgia and supposed representation of the times.

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Poster: Arck Date: Apr 6, 2013 3:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Sounds like you'd be better off listening to someone singing Shakespeare if you're so worried about this. Some Doors lyrics are bad. Some are good. Some Dead lyrics are bad. Some are good. Some Beatles lyrics are bad. Some are good. And so on. It's rock and roll. Why are you so desperate to denigrate The Doors' work due to a few examples? Did Ray Manzarek hit on your wife at a book signing? Just stop listening to them if it irks you so much!

This post was modified by Arck on 2013-04-06 22:07:00

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 3:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Seems like you need to work on your'e reading comprehension since I said that at least twice in this thread that many artists right bad lyrics.I am denigrating the Doors because that was the point of this thread from my perspective.I would think anyone reading this thread that is not a moron would realize that I never listen to the Doors,I'lll repeat that like Jim is fond of doing,I never listen to the Doors.As for you telling me what I should and shouldn't listen to I offer a heartfelt go fuck yourself.

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Poster: Arck Date: Apr 6, 2013 5:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

So why waste your time writing (NB: it's "write" not "right") several posts about a band you don't listen to on a Grateful Dead forum? You're working awfully hard to state an opinion about music you "never listen to".

Why bother? Just enjoy listening to whatever you like listening to rather than demeaning music which you admit to never listening to and which others, such as myself, like. Swearing at another poster who criticises your posts isn't the most mature response either.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 5:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

At what point did you become the arbiter of what I can and can't post here as far as subject matter and why do you keep telling me what I should listen to?Other people in this thread disagreed with me,but didn't feel the need to tell me what I should do 3 or 4 times,that would seem to be lacking in maturity.I think the point of this thread was clearly stated in the very first post and if that doesn't sit well with you I can't really say that I care,there are a lot of threads I question here and I usually ignore them or participate in a way that doesn't tell the poster he has no right to post on that subject or have that opinion because it differs with mine.I spent so much time posting on this because I felt that I should respond to people who took the time to post on a thread I started.

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Poster: huntr Date: Apr 6, 2013 8:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

A leaf of all colors plays a golden-string fiddle, To a double-e waterfall over my back.... much?

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Poster: Kate. Date: Apr 9, 2013 9:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

"...hope I die before I get old..."

the tweed visigoth is (again) at the castle door

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Poster: rdenirojb87 Date: Apr 6, 2013 6:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Jim Morrison Talks Jive?

Who doesn't like to bump a gunk a chuca, or bop a luba? I don't know 'bout you, but these lyrics really speak to me man.

Each yall bump a kechonk! I think Jim was just ahead of his time and was actually speaking jive:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXSLcYQHqFQ

This post was modified by rdenirojb87 on 2013-04-06 13:07:05

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 11:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Jim Morrison Talks Jive?

Summed up nicely RD.

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Apr 5, 2013 9:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I take the Doors on a tune by tune basis and only in small doses, back in college they were briefly in the rotation, now I haven't listened to some Doors in 20 years...those lyrics aren't worse than some of those tragic Weir numbers...Pigpen had his share of drunken Lovelight rants...i will say that the Morrisson lizard king stuff is pretty ridiculous...

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 5, 2013 10:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Well for the most part I think Pigpen is a drunken,misogynistic buffoon hiding behind some lame bluesman persona who onstage said some really offensive and inexcusable stuff and no one calls Weir the American Poet.I'm not saying they are not talented musicians or that he is a terrible song writer,I can understand people liking them,I just despise Jim Morrison,very much like Frank Zappa he seems to be a pretentious,self important douche bag.Their music sounds gimmicky,dated and lacks backbone,although he is a very good singer.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 6, 2013 7:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

A little harsh on the Pig, but I am sympathetic to your position; I have always thought that the "act" was something that didn't translate well over time, and your description is an apt one for me, BUT I think we have to temper it w a couple of points. First, he was one of the founders, and clearly looking for a hook or an approach to center the band and assist with commercial appeal, landing gigs, etc., etc. (I think in many respects he thought about this in 65-66 as much as Jerry or Phil). It really was his band. As a 20 yr old, we have to recognize he might take on these airs to achieve any number of effects/affects, and cut him some slack. Second, he was clearly admired/loved by the band members, many of whom we think of highly, and that counts for something...when he was left behind by the late 60s, w the direction the band took, his whole shtick was passe, though they still considered it part of the show for a while.

Anyhoo, I often been equally hard on the guy, but I think there is something to be said for separating the boy from the act.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 10:36am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

http://archive.org/details/gd69-12-20.sbd.cotsman.6301.sbefail.shnf

Here is Pig at his most offensive.He starts a rap at 19:15 about the end of situation with a woman and at 19:52 says"you get yourself a pistol and you say come on cunt get out" he goes on with "I say well you best get out cause if'n you don't get out I'm gonna do something wrong to you". This is just one in a long line of stupid shit he said in his lame bluesman pose.

As usual WT you call for some reason and make some points proving it's necessity,most of us are not the same person we were at 20 or 25 so I could definitely cut him some slack there and all the other points you made are equally valid.

My main problem with Pigpen is his whole "schtick" in a band that was purely about the music,no stage "outfits",no political posturing,no real stage theatrics,pretty much just music.I also find him absent of any real talent,I don't think anyone would argue that he was a good singer,he was barely competent,he was an awful harmonica player,although I have to say I sometimes very much enjoyed what he brought to the keyboard seat,it had a quirky quality which at times fit nicely into the mix.

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Poster: GerryO Date: Apr 6, 2013 6:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I prefer a good Hard to Handle, It's a Man's World, Good Lovin', Easy Wind and Midnight Hour to most Lovelights, and with Pigpen fronting the band, they were free to do so many great things, including some really fun back-up singing, and his keyboards really did fit nicely.

Unveiling Dave's Picks Volume 6

Tracklist

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA 12/20/69

Disc 2
1 Dark Star> [20:38]
2 St. Stephen> [10:40]
3 The Eleven> [11:32]
4 New Speedway Boogie [8:27]

Disc 3
1 Turn On Your Lovelight [35:15]
2 Mason’s Children [7:19]
3 China Cat Sunflower> [5:31]
4 I Know You Rider [6:07]
5 High Time [8:16]
6 Me And My Uncle [3:30]
7 Hard To Handle [5:11]
8 Cumberland Blues [5:33]

Fox Theater, St. Louis, MO 2/2/70

Disc 1
1 Casey Jones [4:31]
2 Mama Tried [3:03]
3 Hard To Handle [5:39]
4 Cold Rain and Snow [5:32]
5 Black Peter [9:49]
6 Cumberland Blues [5:14]
7 Dark Star> [22:00]
8 St. Stephen> [5:11]
9 Mason’s Children [5:29]
10 Good Lovin’ [5:09]
11 Uncle John's Band [6:37]

Disc 2
1 Turn On Your Lovelight> [14:06]
2 Not Fade Away [1:20]
3 Turn On Your Lovelight [3:38]
4 And We Bid You Goodnight [3:07]

In a few months this may get more interesting.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 6, 2013 8:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: DP6

Where did you get this tracklist? I haven't seen it anywhere.

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Poster: GerryO Date: Apr 6, 2013 9:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: DP6

I've been putting all that I read into a text file.
----------------------------------------------------------
Product Details

"Dave's Picks Volume 6 will feature 2 complete shows with never-before-heard material from
2/2/70 Fox Theater, St. Louis, MO
and
12/20/69 Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA"

http://www.dead.net/store/music/live-shows/daves-picks-2013-subscription

Dave's Picks 2013 Subscription Benefits:

Four Limited Edition, Numbered Releases Delivered Quarterly

Highly Collectible Bonus Disc

RE: the bonus disk

"12/21/69, was once missing reels, but we've acquired the elusive first reel to go with the end of the show that we've always had.
This jam-packed CD, featuring 75 minutes of music (almost 40 minutes of never-before-heard)"

sooo...02/02/70 & 12/20/69 in their entirety, plus 75 minutes from 12/21/69 (probably just the 2nd set of below)

12/21/69
Fillmore Auditorium - San Francisco, CA

Set 1:
Smokestack Lightning
New Speedway Boogie
Mama Tried
Dire Wolf
Mason's Children

Set 2:
China Cat Sunflower
I Know You Rider
Black Peter
Not Fade Away
Uncle John's Band
High Time
Good Lovin'
Drums
Good Lovin'
Cryptical Envelopment
Drums
The Other One
Cryptical Envelopment
Cumberland Blues

Free Domestic Shipping

Dave’s Picks 2013 Subscription shipping schedule:

Volume 5 - UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 11/17/73 (ships February 1, 2013)

Volume 6 - Fox Theater, St. Louis, MO, 2/2/70 &
Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA 12/20/69 (ships May 1, 2013)

http://rhino.edgeboss.net/download/rhino/gdead/listeningparty/dp2013_blackpeter.mp3

Unveiling Dave's Picks Volume 6

Tracklist

Fox Theater, St. Louis, MO 2/2/70

Disc 1
1 Casey Jones [4:31]
2 Mama Tried [3:03]
3 Hard To Handle [5:39]
4 Cold Rain and Snow [5:32]
5 Black Peter [9:49]
6 Cumberland Blues [5:14]
7 Dark Star> [22:00]
8 St. Stephen> [5:11]
9 Mason’s Children [5:29]
10 Good Lovin’ [5:09]
11 Uncle John's Band [6:37]

Disc 2
1 Turn On Your Lovelight> [14:06]
2 Not Fade Away [1:20]
3 Turn On Your Lovelight [3:38]
4 And We Bid You Goodnight [3:07]

Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA 12/20/69

1 Dark Star> [20:38]
2 St. Stephen> [10:40]
3 The Eleven> [11:32]
4 New Speedway Boogie [8:27]

Disc 3
1 Turn On Your Lovelight [35:15]
2 Mason’s Children [7:19]
3 China Cat Sunflower> [5:31]
4 I Know You Rider [6:07]
5 High Time [8:16]
6 Me And My Uncle [3:30]
7 Hard To Handle [5:11]
8 Cumberland Blues [5:33]

We're really bad at keeping secrets around here so just imagine how hard it's been for us to contain our excitement
about the 2 now complete shows, once missing reels for more than 40 years,
that have been selected to make up Dave's Picks Volume 6.
The first major return of material to the vault since 2005's Houseboat Tapes,

Dave's Picks Volume 6 will feature 2 complete shows with never-before-heard material from 2/2/70 Fox Theater, St. Louis, MO
and 12/20/69 Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA. Long a mystery, the riddle of the 2/2/70 set list
has now been solved and the music restored to its proper - and spectacular - sequence.

12-20-69 Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, Ca. (Sat)

1:
Mason's Children,
China Cat> I Know You Rider,
High Time,
Me & My Uncle,
Hard To Handle,
Cumberland,
Black Peter

2:
Dark Star>
St. Stephen>
The Eleven>
New Speedway Boogie>
Lovelight

2/2/70 is also notable as the first show without Tom Constanten.

Cumberland Blues,
Dark Star> St. Stephen> Mason's Children,
Lovelight

Tom, however, makes his return to give his first-hand perspective on 12/20/69 in this volume's liner notes.
Pigpen fiends, ask and you shall receive.
Both shows feature loads of Pigpen including a major 35+ minute "Lovelight" from 12/20/69.
Recorded by Bear with an excellent mix and sound quality, this very special release feels like a return to the classics.

If you've been curious about the subscribers-only bonus disc, this one is the stuff of lore as well.
Like Dave's Picks Volume 6, the last-ever Grateful Dead show at the Fillmore Auditorium - 12/21/69,
was once missing reels, but we've acquired the elusive first reel to go with the end of the show that we've always had.
This jam-packed CD, featuring 75 minutes of music (almost 40 minutes of never-before-heard),
includes one of only three versions of "Smokestack Lightning" from 1969.
You most certainly won't want to miss out on this highly collectible Dead!

The only way to guarantee you'll get these historic releases is to get a Dave's Picks 2013 subscription.
The subscription offer ends January 22, 2013 at 11:59PM PST, so grab one while you can!

Bonus disc - Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, CA
12/21/69 (ships May 1, 2013)

Volume 7 - ships August 1, 2013

Volume 8 - ships November 1, 2013

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Poster: William Tell Date: Apr 6, 2013 12:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Hey jl--whoa, that's actually new to me, and certainly has to rank as the worst...no excusing, only trying to understand (to the degree possible), I wonder if for some of these he was literally drunk (again no excuse)...eg, at the end of the 9-19-70 LL, when he and Phil come back (to tell the fans why they can't play any more), he is clearly angry/cranky/drunk?, dismissive and combative (I am reading a lot into it...). Nonetheless, the "c" word, except when used on the basketball court after a hacker like Flow or Dire has undercut you on wide open layup, is virtually inexcusable w regard to usage for our XX lady friends of any sort.

Anyhoo--maybe it requires no explanation except that they were NEVER the sorts to stand up to anyone/anything, but strange that Jerry and Phil and the others never even seem to have any reaction to it, ya know? Or at most, Bobby playfully interacts w him over it...during or after shows. ONe would think some of the gals might have had something to say about it all one way or the otehr.

I will say the early yrs, say Mid Hr or GMLSG, in 66, have more of the less sexist drivel in his raps, and even the very appealing "...that's it...play your guitar..." exchanges w Jerry.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 12:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I can't imagine the band identifying with those sentiments,but it seems they just chalked it up to letting Pig be Pig.It isn't so much this one instance,but many separate one's in a similar vein that would make you lose respect for the guy as far as how he interacted with women and degraded them with his ignorant remarks.He is obviously drunk on that recording and I can't say how much of those type theatrics are driven by his stage act,but if your'e stupid enough to say it then it doesn't really matter.

After all my bad mouthing there are probably a dozen or so Lovelight's I consider to be extraordinary,unique performances with Pig playing a central role.I am not well versed in the 65'-67' part of their history as the focus is too much on the blues and the level of musicianship is not quite developed enough for my liking.

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Poster: high flow Date: Apr 6, 2013 1:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Maybe schtick, maybe it's just Pig.

I always felt there was a similar grey area in rap music. Most rappers weren't actually killers and felons, but most told stories which made it seem like they might have been.

Somewhere along the way I just decided to look at provocative music the same way I view at a movie like Goodfellas or a TV show like Breaking Bad. Listen to Ice-T or Pigpen with the same willingness to be entertained and assume the delivery is meant to stir the audience's emotions and voila, you have creative genius. But if that part of the stage persona leaks in to everyday life, you simply have a creep on your hands.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 2:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I think taking on a persona goes back to those old timey folk ballads and through C+W,blues and is carried on in the rock tradition and hip-hop like you said and I pick and choose what I relate to accordingly,generally I can't get with hateful,ignorant spouting off under any guise in music,visual arts I find to be a completely different way of telling a story,although I do get your point.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 6, 2013 6:46pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

That's certainly a fascinating example of a Pigpen tale...
Actually I don't remember hearing another one like that, though there may well be more examples in '69. But threatening violence to a woman must be really rare in the Lovelight raps; 99% of the time he's just asking for sex.

The other thing about this is, this Lovelight is going to be officially released next month, so perhaps we will get to hear the end of the tale & how it turned out between him & his woman...
It's possible he was extra-drunk that night, he does sound a bit more aggressive than usual, and perhaps this does reflect something personal.
I notice a couple things about this tale, though - one, despite the pistol threat, the woman has a counter-threat, so he presents the two people as equally matched (or, more exactly, the man as stuck & unable to get out of the situation, not on top of things). One of the odd role reversals of this particular tale is that usually Pigpen presents himself as extremely needy & desperate for women.
Also, the story is clearly intended as humor, like most of his Lovelight raps, though it doesn't come across that way. (Another example is the famous 4/17/71 Good Lovin', where Pigpen tells the story of buying a fat girl from some pimp after a fight with his "old lady" - evidently meant to be hilarious.)

Another thing to recall about this type of drivel is that Pigpen's whole shtick was copying older blues acts, and such aggressive posturing was definitely a part of it. Recall Robert Johnson singing "I'm gonna beat my woman til I get satisfied" or "if she gets unruly I'll take my 32-20 and cut her half in two," just to name an example. (And if you know about the bluesmen of that era, they lived in levels of personal violence that easily outmatch today's rappers.) So Pigpen lapped this stuff up like mother's milk, along with more sympathetic blues material (like, say, Lovelight itself).

One thing's for sure: it was an act. When Blair Jackson was researching Pigpen's life, he found that Pigpen was unanimously loved among everyone who knew him, no one had a bad word to say (of course, dying young will often put your bad points off-limits among friends). All the bandmembers say that he was really a sweet, sensitive softie, and this whole big bad bluesman persona was just stage posturing. More remarkably, women who were his friends say the same thing.

I won't defend anything he says onstage, just point out that 1) in his teens & 20's, he thought it was really cool to imitate older black bluesmen in every respect, including their aggressive or boastful attitudes, and 2) the band & audience loved it. (You can hear all the cheers, for instance, during this particular Lovelight tale.)
Doesn't mean anyone has to love it today, but this kind of thing really struck a chord in the '60s, judging by all the white singers who were trying to do similarly sexual blues-rock acts. While it may seem strange that the rest of the Dead would accept it, keep in mind that at the time, their views or treatment of women in 'real life' were probably not much different from his, or for that matter most other young '60s musicians.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 8:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I go back and forth on how much is bluesman posturing as opposed to truly feeling that way,not knowing the man I can only speculate and that is really no way to come to any kind of conclusion.It just seems by his raps that at the very least he see's women as purely sexual beings here to service men whether or not they need to be chased down or they give them self to the man.I just can't wrap my brain around seeing another human as subservient,especially one your'e involved with intimately,it just seems so ignorant and backward thinking in a time where there was actually a little growth in those areas and you would think being around strong,intelligent women it would open his eyes some to the lameness of the crap he was helping to perpetuate by doing those raps as entertaining and harmless as they might seem.You wisely pointed out a bunch of guys cheering the violent threats.

WT smartly made the points you did in that he was young and impressionable and filling a role in the band and I know I'm overly critical of the guy,but I have a hard time relating to that level of lack of awareness,I mean I'm not that far removed from those times I was 16 in 74' and I remember women commanding much more respectful treatment.

As far as there being other examples of Lovelight's this far out there I can't recall any and I gave a fairly close listen to most all that are available,that's not to say there aren't because I surely could have missed some,but this one stood out in my mind.It's funny I hadn't put together until GerryO and your post that this is the next Dave's Picks and we will hopefully get to hear the rest of the tale as I was wondering today where it wound up as the band seemed real quiet as he was doing his thing.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 6, 2013 10:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

The '60s were very sexist times, not to excuse Pigpen, just to note that he had a lot of social support for his kind of raps - audiences ate them up. (And, as we've mentioned in this forum before, Dead audiences were primarily young men.)

Far from strong, intelligent women around Pigpen opening his eyes, I suspect they may have dug his raps as much as the men. What he did onstage was the flipside of what Janis did (and their Lovelights together are notorious). Several bandmembers have said that black women in particular loved Pigpen; so it doesn't seem like anyone took offense at him at the time, instead they were charmed. Reading the loving terms with which some women remembered him was pretty surprising for me; I should quote some of them sometime.

He may have seen those raps as kind of like sexual fantasies with no bearing on real life, all just in play. I think a lot of stuff he sang with no thought at all. In a way, his role was as a public id, enacting the male audience's desires to be the man in control with women at his fingertips, etc. But he also picked up a lot of the dualism in blues songs, where on one hand women are sexual conquests, and on the other hand they're all-powerful beings to be supplicated. (Lovelight has both poles, where the song has the man begging, & then the rap has the man picking up the ladies with a snap.)
He wrote few songs himself, but in some of them (Operator, Empty Pages & Two Souls) he comes across as desperately lonely. Of course that was possibly a blues-soaked act as well, with little reflection of the 'real' Pigpen.
What he expressed onstage was very limited in scope, especially since it was such a limited repertoire, most of it borrowed from earlier blues singers. When the people who knew him agree that in person he was nothing like the onstage Pigpen, and they all admired him, I'm wary of drawing any conclusions about him.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 7, 2013 9:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

None of what you said is lost on me.I was referring not to the women who would be willing to date Pigpen,but women like Betty Cantor,Mountain Girl and I would assume some other smart women around the scene and just being alive at that time who would open his eyes a little bit.

Even if it was just his role in the band and wasn't what he was like it kept all those fools in the crowd cheering along to some damaging material and if just one guy went home and punched his girlfriend in the face because that type of behavior was reinforced in his dull mind by Pigpen then that's one too many for some showbiz bravado.Bottom line is that is a lame persona to take on and the rest of the band should be ashamed to have backed that weak shit and at some point called him on it,maybe not 65' or 67' but certainly by Dec 69'.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 7, 2013 11:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

Mountain Girl said in an interview:
"You couldn't help but love Pigpen. He was loveable and everybody liked him. He sang like an old blues singer - it wasn't so much what he sang, it was how he was singing it. He had a lot of soul. It was sure sad to lose him."

Betty Cantor has never said anything about Pigpen that I know of, but Rosie McGee (Phil's girlfriend) wrote about how he behaved with her at 710 Ashbury: "...a gruff kind of low-key flirting, all in jest, but sometimes accompanied by an ass-grab. I did spend some time alone with Pig in his room, talking with him and listening to him play his guitar and sing softly. In those timeless moments, I learned what a big-hearted softie he really was."
She also writes a lot about Pigpen's girlfriend Veronica, a black lady who sounds like nobody's fool.

Anyway, all the women in that scene who've said anything about Pigpen pretty much say the same things (none of them, by the way, were his girlfriends). Not only did Pigpen win friendship & support from the women around him, the band was not ashamed to back Pigpen's raps and didn't consider them lame; they were impressed by his ability to spin off these tales. Nobody was ever going to call him on his attitude. That's just the historical perspective I wanted to add; you can call it a blindness in the people around him; but we're free to judge Pigpen as we like.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 8, 2013 10:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I'm not trying to demonize the guy and I wouldn't doubt he was as portrayed by the comments made about him,I'm simply calling him on what was a small part of his "act" that was unacceptable.Any reasonable person who broke down some of the things he said and the attitude it conveyed would have to find it questionable at best,not the innocuous stuff,the under my thumb,perform your role type of shit.I'm pretty sure we all have a friend or family member who is a bit of a racist,sexist,homophobe or what have you and we still chose to think of them as a loveable guy or an old softie,but that doesn't make those attitudes any more palatable.

I can see the band grooving on his ability to weave a Brooklyn bridge tale or some of the other colorful stories he incorporated into his raps,but at the base of his bluesman pose was an attitude that women were to be treated as a man saw fit and you would hope that wouldn't be acceptable behavior to people you considered intelligent.I would think that it was obvious in this thread I wasn't dictating what people should think about Pigpen,although I surely would be interested in the perspective someone as intelligent as Althearose had on the subject.

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Apr 8, 2013 2:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I wrote a post early Saturday on this thread, and as I went to post it the Archive went into maintenance - it was lost. Going back to your original thrust, totally agree with loathing the Doors and their thin, simplistic sound. Always hated the organ leads. Their only song that worked well was in movie context, in Apocalypse now. Never understood the deifying of Morrison.

I'm with you about Pigpen, up to a point. Although some "elders" here see him as essential to the band's early development and popularity, I can't find much to like in his strained vocals, pathetic harmonica, and tedious raps. Mr. Charlie and H2H are the best - because the music is so strong. Perhaps his strongest contribution is channeling some of the band's early energy into full-on blues, and helping JG become the guitarist that he was meant to be in the process.

I get that you think his schtick is totally misogynistic - it is - but I think it's the sincerest form of flattery when you idolize blues singers. He wanted to BE Lightnin' Hopkins or Robert Johnson in the moment, in the act of performing. He considered himself following in a long line of blues singers, with the same intent - getting some hooch and scoring with the ladies. Mostly harmless, until you use language as you cited, or drink yourself to death. I always hated his objectifying women by calling them his "rider" - as disposable as a motorcycle, but this term of 'endearment' can be found decades before Pig.

Bottom line - I can give Pig a pass most of the time, since it was a performance and not the man everyone knew in person. But, I can't give a pass to poor musicianship; nor can I tolerate most gangsta rap thuggery, since it also plays out in mayhem on the streets, even though it derives from similar roots.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 8, 2013 4:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I'm always pleased when we can be even somewhat on the same wavelength because I have great respect for most everything you post,and unlike some folks you seem to understand what I was getting at.The music stuff is subjective and really who cares,but there is just an overwhelming lack of respect tied into Pig's whole hard drinkin',macho man act,and why he is that way is immaterial.You can explain away almost any type of misbehavior,but that doesn't undo the harm it can cause,kind of like what you were saying about the effect of gangsta rap thuggery.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 8, 2013 12:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I was hoping AltheaRose would chime in as well, but she seems to be in one of her non-internet periods.

I suspect the whole band were what might be called 'sexist pigs' by today's standards, and probably any women who knew them accepted that, just like they'd accept massive drinking or drug use. The status of being around a 'rock star' means all kinds of behavior can get swept under the rug. Sexist attitudes would be par for the course - though Pigpen's unique in that he chose to directly rap about it onstage.

I'm surprised you consider Mick Jagger's type of lyrics innocuous compared to Pigpen. Seems like the other way around to me - Jagger's a lot nastier in some songs! If Jagger's just a harmless put-on, Pigpen fits in the same role...at least I'd guess few people take him too seriously. I've seen many complaints about his raps being dull, repetitive, taking away from the music, etc, but almost none about their being offensive.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 8, 2013 1:04pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I didn't mean that under my thumb reference in relation to Jagger,I meant it attitudinal way,it was a very poorly constructed and confusing sentence in hindsight.I couldn't express how little respect I have for Jagger as a person.

It doesn't seem like I clearly expressed what it is about Pigpen I find distasteful,I get the wide view on his view raps in that were playful and not meant in any way to be harmful or mean spirited,and I'm not sitting back analyzing every word and taking him overly seriously,but the undercurrent of what he is preaching comes from an ugly and unwelcome past.

I personally am not willing to give the guys a pass for being sexist douche bags because they were rock stars or products of their times,they seemed to have figured out that racism wasn't proper behavior and that was certainly prevalent in the same timespan and I'm pretty sure there was a women's movement pushing an agenda that the way they were being treated was unacceptable and shameful that the boys might have caught wind of.Again this was the late 60's-early 70's not 1962.It's sort of like now where it's still kind of okay to shit on women,gay and Jewish people to a certain extent,but not being any of those there are more credible people to speak to it than me.

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Poster: Skobud Date: Apr 8, 2013 8:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

"The '60s were very sexist times, not to excuse Pigpen, just to note that he had a lot of social support for his kind of raps - audiences ate them up."

Fuck yea they were. Leon Russell made an entire career doing essentially the same style as Pig. More R&B but full of raps.

Whatever happened to just being fucking "wild"? Everybody knows some crazy motherfucker(s) like that. At least I have. Dudes from outer space, like a different breed. That's how I think of him. My conclusion about him is that he was a fucking presence wherever he went. He drank all day every day. That is insane.

Man's World opener from 4/15/70 pretty much sums up everything I love about Pig in one tune. He was a badass. The power of the voice. Like Wolf. The emotion he conveyes is locomotive style. Dominating shit.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 8, 2013 11:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

It seems to me Leon Russell made a career of writing standards like A Song for You,This Masquerade,Superstar,I Put a Spell on You and that's not even getting into the bulk of his more rock,r+b,blues,country repertoire.He is also a very talented musician on keyboards,bass and guitar and played on countless studio sessions.So some blues raps aside I can't see how they have anything at all in common.Howlin' Wolf was a legend and to put Pigpen on his level is a stretch,Pig had a weak voice and I've never heard him get through a vocal without some sort of screw up,voice crack,or timing issue.

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Poster: Skobud Date: Apr 8, 2013 6:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

I disagree. You are changing what I actually said so it suits your point. You have completely missed my point. Leon and Pig were similar in some ways and I think Pig had a powerful voice.

To say Leon and Pig had "nothing in common" is simply not true. Have you ever even heard "Leon Live"? I have no idea how you can say they have nothing in common. That is total bullshit.

When I said "Like Wolf" I was referring to the power of Pig's voice when his game was on. I never compared them as musicians. I was talking about the power of the voice - not who was a better or more talented musician.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 8, 2013 8:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

As I pointed out Leon made a career out of being a great songwriter,singer and musician who performed many styles of music from blues,c+w,r+b,rock and gospel.You said he made "an entire career doing essentially the same style as Pig",which is really undervaluing Leon's talents,I did not completely miss your point I completely disagree with it.I think saying Pig,a half-ass,blues wannabe and the great Leon Russell have common ground is quite humorous.As for Pig's powerful voice I guess we'll have to say to each his own.

I didn't compare Howlin' Wolf and Pigpen as musicians either,I said"Howlin' Wolf was a legend and to put Pigpen on his level is a stretch,Pig had a weak voice and I've never heard him get through a vocal without some sort of screw up,voice crack or timing issue".




This post was modified by jerlouvis on 2013-04-09 03:28:30

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Poster: Skobud Date: Apr 9, 2013 4:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

You just completely repeated yourself. Fine. I get it.

According to you Pigpen is a half-assed wannabe and "The Great" Leon Russell is extremely talented and terribly undervalued and shares absolutely no common ground with Pigpen nor does Pigpen share any comon ground with Wolf, and bringing them up in the same conversation is blasphemy.

Whatever.







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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 9, 2013 8:01am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

Partially correct,but any further discussion seems useless because you are still half wrong and it is a ridiculous conversation.

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Poster: Skobud Date: Apr 9, 2013 12:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

Ridiculous is correct, you've now repeated yourself twice and just now called me "partially correct" and "half wrong" in the same sentence. That doesn't even make sense.

Listen man, obviously no one has explained to you that if you do not have the basic grammar skills required to write properly, it invalidates any point you make. Every sentence you write is a run on and the punctuation is totally fucking wrong. How you can possibly expect to be taken seriously is beyond me, especially when the basic rules of grammar are obviously out of your reach.

If you are going to talk so much shit, at least have the common courtesy of learning basic sentence structure.

I read up on you dude. This LIA wannabe thing you think you are doing is as transparent as your logic. Just because you think something is true, does not make it true. It only makes it your opinion - which is both "partially correct" and "half wrong".


This post was modified by Skobud on 2013-04-09 19:02:46

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Poster: snori Date: Apr 7, 2013 7:09am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

It is unfair to judge music. lyrics, and behaviour by today's standards. (And some of the songs Pig sang were prety old) Do you think 'Good morning little schoolgirl' would get airtimme today ?

I like some Doors songs (LA Woman springs to mind)others don't do anything for me at all, though it might have been interesting to see an early live show.

Here's Jerry's opinion -

Jerry Garcia: I never liked The Doors. I found them terribly offensive... when we played with them. It was back when (Jim) Morrison was just a Mick Jagger copy. That was his whole shot, that he was a Mick Jagger imitation. Not vocally, but his moves, his whole physical appearence, were totally stolen from right around Mick Jagger's 1965 tour of the States. He used to move around a lot, before he started to earn his reputation as a poet, which I thought was not really deserved. Rimbaud was great at eighteen, nineteen, and Verlaine. Those guys were great. Fuckin' Jim Morrison wasn't great. I'm sorry.

I could never see what it was about The Doors. They had a very brittle sound live, a three-piece band with no bass-the organ player (Ray Manzarek) used to do it. That and that kinda raga-rock guitar style was strange. It sounded very brittle and sharp-edged to me, not something I enjoyed listening to.

I kind of appreciated some of the stuff that they did later, and I appreciated a certain amount of Morrison's sheer craziness, just because that's always a nice trait in rock and roll. No, I never knew him, but Richard Loren, who works for us, was his agent and had to babysit him through his most drunken scenes and all the times he got busted and all that crap. He's got lots of stories to tell about Morrison.

I was never attracted to their music at all, so I couldn't really find anything to like about them. When we played with them, I think I watched the first tune or two, then I went upstairs and fooled with my guitar. There was nothing there that I wanted to know about. He was so patently an imitation of Mick Jagger that it was offensive. To me, when The Doors played in San Francisco they typified Los Angeles coming to San Francisco, which I equated with having the look right, but zero substance. This is way before their hit song "Light My Fire." Probably at the time in their development it was too early for anybody to make a decent judgement of them, but I've always looked for something else in music, and whatever it was they didn't have it. They didn't have anything of blues, for example, in their sound and feel.

Jackson: Did you sense the negativity?

Garcia: No, not really. All I sensed was sham. As far as I was concerned, it was just surface and no substance. Then we opened for them in Santa Barbara some years later, when they were a little more powerful. Their sound had gotten better-they'd gotten more effectively amplified, so Manzarek's bass lines and stuff like that had a little more throb, but their sound was still thin. It wasn't a successful version of a three-piece band, like The Who or Jimi Hendrix or Cream, or any of the other guitar power-trio-type three piece bands. It's an interesting concept-a three-piece band that's keyboard, guitar and drums-but it was missing some element that I felt was vital. I couldn't say exactly what it was, but it was not satisfying for me to listen to them.

***

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 7, 2013 8:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Pigpen

Well the Pigpen stuff was 1969 not 1951 so I will feel free to judge his behavior as unacceptable.I understand that over years what is acceptable in all art forms change.Interesting Garcia quotes I have never seen the first and last paragraphs.

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Apr 5, 2013 11:26pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I prefer Pig on the GD originals, especially Easy Wind, or a blues number like Katie Mae or Smokestack without the room to comp on the chords and rant for 20 minutes about getting your hands out of your pockets, etc...I haven't listened to Schoolgirl or Lovelight in years, some of those versions go on forever...

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Poster: segan63 Date: Apr 6, 2013 2:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I don't know. I think it's easy to cherry pick lyrics from a band's catalog and talk about how lame they are. Maybe on some Doors' forum, there are people making sport of "streetcats making love"...

As for Roadhouse Blues, I got burnt out on that song in high school. There are a handful of Doors songs that I enjoy starting with Peace Frog, When the Music's Over, and The End. They also released a pretty decent live album with Absolutely Live...

But yeah, they're not the Dead...

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 11:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

This was in no way meant to be a comparison of the Doors with the Dead,and they should be goofing on LLR on the Doors forum,I make no argument that Weir and Hunter didn't write a ton of very lame lyrics.My problem is in what high esteem Morrison is held as a lyricist.

Peace Frog is a song that as best I can make out is about the rioting and unrest among the youth in the late 60's and some stuff about a suffering woman of which I am unsure why she is suffering,there also seems to be an inordinate amount of blood being spilled in the streets.He fits this awful line into the mix.

indians scattered on dawns highway bleeding
ghosts crowd the young child's fragile eggshell mind

In The End which topic is evident he treats us to this gem.

lost in a Roman...wilderness of pain
all the children are insane
all the children are insane
waiting for the summer rain,yeah

I can take solace in the fact that his lyrics aren't as bad as the snippets of his poetry I have come across,and none seem to be as "cock-centric" as the poem found further down this thread.

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Poster: bigdaddy dave Date: Apr 7, 2013 3:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Indians scattered on dawns highway bleeding
ghosts crowd the young child's fragile eggshell mind


As I have read/heard about that lyric it was alluding to a time in Morrisons younger years. While on a family trip the clan came across an accident on the highway.

Apparently, there was a group of native Americans riding in the back of a pick-up truck involved in the wreck, several were killed, and the entire incident made quite the impression on a young and impressionable Lizard King

Hardly an "awful" line.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 7, 2013 9:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Yeah I know where the line supposedly comes from and crowbarring it into some dreck about political unrest make it an awful line.

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Poster: segan63 Date: Apr 6, 2013 1:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Yeah, I don't know what the lyrics mean to Peace Frog exactly, either. But to me, lyrics are usually secondary to the music(except in Dylan's case). The reason I like Peace Frog so much, is because that song's probably got a better hook than other Doors' songs. The End is pretty hypnotic. Of course it helps that I now identify that song with Apocalypse Now...

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 2:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Again I'm not trying to tell anyone how they should hear music I'm just pointing out what I find objectionable with the Doors stuff,I love Bob Dylan's music and could not even begin to make sense of some of the lyrics in Visions of Johanna,but find it to be a masterpiece of imagery and song craft yet if someone wanted to they could pick it apart as babble.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 6, 2013 11:06am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

I'm with you on Easy Wind and Smokestack and I also liked Mr. Charlie,Hard to Handle and wondered why they never stuck with Operator,but for the most part what was good about those songs was the music being played by the band,it was never a great vocal by Pigpen for me.

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Poster: hseamons Date: Apr 6, 2013 7:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Lament for my cock
Sore and crucified
I seek to know you
Aquiring soulful wisdom
You can open walls of mystery
Stripshow

How to aquire death in the morning show
TV death which the child absorbs
Deathwell mystery which makes me write
Slow train, the death of my cock gives life

Forgive the poor old people who gave us entry
Taught us god in the child's prayer in the night

Guitar player
Ancient wise satyr
Sing your ode to my cock

Caress it's lament
Stiffen and guide us, we frozen
Lost cells
The knowledge of cancer
To speak to the heart
And give the great gift
Words Power Trance

This stable friend and the beast of his zoo
Wild haired chicks
Women flowery in your summit
Monsters of skin
Each color connects
To create the boat
Which rocks the race
Could any hell be more horrible
Than now
And real?

I pressed her thigh and death smiled
Death, old friend
Death and my cock are the world
I can forgive my injuries in the name of
Wisdom Luxury Romance

Sentence upon sentence
Words are healing lament
For the death of my cock's spirit
Has no meaning in the soft fire
Words got me the wound and will get me well
I you believe it

All join now and lament for the death of my cock
A tounge of knowledge in the feathered night
Boys get crazy in the head and suffer
I sacrifice my cock in the altar of silence

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Poster: Reade Date: Apr 6, 2013 11:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

You gotta admit when he took the letters of his name and rearranged them to come up w/ 'Mr. Mojo Risin,' ....that was pretty profound.

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Poster: Quincy Date: Apr 7, 2013 9:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

"You gotta admit when he took the letters of his name and rearranged them to come up w/ 'Mr. Mojo Risin,' ....that was pretty profound."

As opposed to mildly profound? Glad I wasn't drinking something when I read this.

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Apr 7, 2013 3:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Doors (non-Dead)

Reade your post got by me somehow and will have to second Quincy sentiments.

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